Investigation of moderator factors in e-business adoption: A quantitative meta-analysis of moderating effects on the drivers of intention and behavior

Boštjan Šumak1, Marjan Heričko1, Zoran Budimac2 and Maja Pušnik1

  1. Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Smetanova ulica 17, 2000 Maribor
    University of Maribor, Slomškov trg 15, 2000 Maribor, Slovenia
    {bostjan.sumak, marjan.hericko, maja.pusnik}@um.si
  2. Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg D. Obradovića 4
    21000 Novi Sad, Serbia
    zjb@dmi.uns.ac.rs

Abstract

E-business technology is becoming one of the most important global markets where e-business solutions will have to adapt to new technologies. The main objective in this study was to synthesize existing knowledge in the field of e-business technology acceptance and to understand differences in Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) related causal effect sizes for different e-business contexts. A quantitative meta-analysis of existing empirical research about factors affecting e-business adoption was conducted using 89 published papers that provided empirical data about causal relationships. A moderator analysis was carried out to investigate the moderating effect of four factors: consumer type, device type, continent and respondent type. The results of the study showed a moderating effect for all four proposed factors in almost all TAM-related causal paths. The study also showed that TAM is the most common theory being applied in e-business adoption research.

Key words

e-business acceptance; meta-analysis; moderator factors analysis; TAM; UTAUT; B2C; B2B

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://doi.org/10.2298/CSIS160902033S

Publication information

Volume 14, Issue 1 (January 2017)
Year of Publication: 2017
ISSN: 1820-0214 (Print) 2406-1018 (Online)
Publisher: ComSIS Consortium

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How to cite

Šumak, B., Heričko, M., Budimac, Z., Pušnik, M.: Investigation of moderator factors in e-business adoption: A quantitative meta-analysis of moderating effects on the drivers of intention and behavior. Computer Science and Information Systems, Vol. 14, No. 1, 75–102. (2017)